September 2007 Vol 0 Issue 9

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A SPECIAL ARTICLE

Extreme Emesis: Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

Narayanan Venkatasubramani, Thangam Venkatesan and BU. K. Li

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a functional disorder without laboratory markers. The challenge to clinicians is to differentiate CVS from the many organic causes of vomiting. This article focuses on the clinical features, including differences between adults and children, potential mechanisms, pertinent exclusionary investigations and treatment approaches.



COLORECTAL CANCER: AN UPDATE, SERIES #6

Inherited Risk for Colorectal Cancer: Practical Approaches for Identification, Referral and Management

Kory Jasperson, Wendy Kohlmann and Randall Burt

This paper reviews the most common causes of hereditary colorectal cancer, presents "red flags" for identification of high-risk patients and discusses the role providers can play in coordinating care for these patients.



INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: A PRACTICAL APPROACH, SERIES #33

Management of Crohn's Today-The European Prospective

Alissa J. Walsh, Matthew Easdale and Simon Travis

A number of therapeutic trials are based in central and eastern Europe where guidelines have yet to be published. The aim of this article is to promote a European prospective on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Summarized are the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization (ECCO) Guidelines which address the differences in practice in the U.S. and Europe.



VIRAL HEPATITIS, SERIES #4

Acute Hepatitis C: Diagnosis and Management

Owen R. McLean and Jorge L. Herrera

Hepatitis C virus infection often leads to chronic hepatitis and early detection is of the utmost importance. Studies evaluating treatment regimen, initiation and length of treatment show that the earlier treatment is begun, the better.



GERD IN THE 21st CENTURY, SERIES #23

Chronic Laryngitis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Jonathan A. Schneider and Michael F. Vaezi

There is no gold-standard in the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and thus, data on its etiology is limited. This paper will highlight the current knowledge and controversy in LPR and discuss current treatments.



NUTRITION ISSUES IN GASTROENTEROLOGY, SERIES #54

Parenteral Nutrition in Pancreatitis is Pass?: But Are We Ready for Gastric Feeding? A Critical Evaluation of the Literature?Part I

Joe Krenitsky, Diklar Makola and Carol Rees Parrish

Part I of this article reviews what the literature says, and does not say, regarding parenteral and enteral ( gastric versus jejunal) nutrition support in the patient with complicated pancreatitis. Part II "A Practical Guide to Jejunal Feeding," will appear in the October issue of Practical Gastroenterology.



Supplement to September 2007

BACTERIA: A MISSING LINK IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME?

Anthony J. Lembo



Supplement to September 2007

THE CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC BURDEN OF IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

Anthony J. Lembo



Supplement to September 2007

CURRENT DIAGNOSTIC STRATEGIES AND PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

Anthony J. Lembo



Supplement to September 2007

POSTINFECTIOUS IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: CLINICAL ASPECTS, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, AND TREATMENT

Herbert L. DuPont



Supplement to September 2007

BACTERIA AND THE ROLE OF ANTIBIOTICS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

Mark Pimentel



Supplement to September 2007

ANTIBIOTICS FOR THE TREATMENT OF FUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS: A CASE SERIES

Anthony J. Lembo, Andrew W. DuPont, Brooks D. Cash, Charles I. Saperstein, and Christine L. Frissora



Departments Section


Medical Bulletin Board

AAAHC Is Now Recruiting Gastroenterologists as Surveyors

The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC/Accreditation Association) is actively looking to recruit new volunteer surveyors to conduct accreditation surveys. Gastroenterologists are particularly encouraged to apply.



HouseMD Today Conference Developed in Response to Resurgence in House Call Medicine

Four Live Events & Online Educational Forum Scheduled



From the Literature

Coffee and Liver Cancer

Mounting evidence indicates that coffee drinking may
protect against liver injury and lower the risk of liver
cancer.



Natalizumab in Crohn's Disease

A randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of natalizumab induction therapy in patients with Crohn's disease was carried out in 509 patients with moderately to severely active Crohnís disease an active inflammation characterized by elevated C-reactive protein concentration, and were randomized to receive the drug at 300 mg or placebo intravenously at weeks zero, 4 and 8.



Book Reviews

Endoscopic Ultrasound: An Introductory Manual and Atlas

This book by Dr. Dietrich and his contributors is a real welcome to the world of endosonography.



Gastrointestinal Physiology

Although it is a small size book, I doubt even an experienced reader will be able to finish it within a day. The book, however, serves its purpose.



From the Literature

FROM THE PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY LITERATURE

It is common for an initial laboratory evaluation to be performed on children with abdominal pain in order to rule out serious entities such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The authors of this multi-center study obtained registry data on 526 children with inflammatory bowel disease (mean age 11.6 years) to see if inflammatory markers were present as a result of their disease.



Erythromycin May Alleviate Cholestasis in Preterm Infants Requiring Parenteral Nutrition

Premature infants have significant problems tolerating enteral feeds, and subsequent parenteral nutrition for a prolonged time period is associated with serious health issues, including recurrent sepsis, issues related to central line access, and the eventual development of cholestasis. The authors of this study evaluated the usage of erythromycin as a motility agent to decrease the incidence of neonatal cholestasis related to long-term parenteral nutrition in Hong Kong.